ONE DROP WATER PROJECT

In Makueni County, Kenya, the Chyulu Valley Water Project is a clear example of a community water business taking steps to expand water supply services through innovative ideas and commercial financing. Under the leadership of Madam Veronica, the project has increased its customer base from 7,000 to 20,000 in four years by constructing 11 new water kiosks and connecting 73 households and institutions to water. The CBO has now established a water bottling plant to boost group income and expand water access.

Clean and reliable water means healthy women and a productive community

When the Cham gi Wanngi women group opened in 2010, the community was hopeful that their children would never die again of water borne diseases.

Promoting improved sanitation through community groups

In June 2019, the Oteki Women’s Group in Uganda – which formed in 2010 offers members low-interest loans through a member savings plan

Environmental Sustainability

Kenya faces a growing challenge of providing its human population with adequate clean water and sanitation services not only for household consumption, but also for agriculture and broader economic growth.

Uganda faces a growing challenge of providing its human population with adequate clean water and sanitation services not only for household consumption, but also for agriculture and broader economic growth. A key focus of the project is building the capacity of governments, institutions and communities to incorporate climate change, gender, and water safety to expand source water protection and improve sanitation.

At the local level, the project works with Water Resource Users Associations (WRUAs) to increase technical and organizational capacity to manage the complex challenges facing their watersheds.

Critically, we target community springs for protection followed by conservation within the spring users’ buffer radius. This helps improve the quality and quantity of water from these sources and hence increase access to potable water mostly by rural communities. In addition, environmental sensitization is done among beneficiary communities on environmental hygiene and use of springs, soil and water conservation on farmlands around the springs.

When the Wiser Secondary School in Muhuru Bay in Migori County opened in 2010, the community was hopeful that their children would be able to have a good education. But the lack of clean, reliable water at the school and in many homes meant students were often absent, helping their mothers make the treacherous journey down to Lake Victoria to collect water, or they were sick with a water-borne disease.

The Muhuru Bay Water Project was established in 2012, was meant to solve this problem. The Project was designed to deliver water to up to 5,000 people in its first phase. Despite this potential, only four water kiosks and three individual connections were connected to water that first year. “The local community was hesitant to embrace payed water since they had the option of fetching from the lake for free,” recounts Enock Wase, the project chairman. “We used a diesel-powered pump which made pumping expensive. Our revenues barely covered operation costs which strained the relatively new project,” he adds.